Attitude Matters On Video

 

Does how you mean to say it get lost in what you are trying to say?

A woman woke up one morning, looked in the mirror, and noticed she had only three hairs on her head. "Well," she said, "I think I'll platt my hair today." So she did and she had a wonderful day. 

The next day she woke up, looked in the mirror and saw that she had only two hairs on her head. "H-M-M," she said, "I think I'll part my hair down the middle today." So she did and she had a grand day. 

The next day she woke up, looked in the mirror and noticed that she had only one hair on her head. "Well," she said, “I always wanted to wear my hair in a ponytail." So she did, and she had a top day. 

The next day she woke up, looked in the mirror and noticed that there wasn't a single hair on her head. "YAY!" she exclaimed. "I don't have to fix my hair today!"

Hasn't she got a great attitude? More importantly, how well do you respond to someone with a great attitude? It inspires me to action.

I see a lot of people making videos who have a great attitude - that is their intent is to be useful and helpful - but it gets clouded by the mechanics of the video and so their effectiveness is diluted.

This is one of the reasons I teach people the on-camera confidence code

It helps you transcend the mechanics of video because the mechanics are limitations on your message.

If you have a message you want to deliver and you want to do it via video, and you want to do it effectively, come and see if how I can help you with my Get Video Smart program.

Take the mystery out of making videos and remove the fear of being on video

Confidently presenting yourself on video is now an essential career skill.

Get Started